Click to see trip plan

A journey through Guatemala's incomparable Mayan World

From

2,118

/ person
  • 1
  • 13 Days

Don Quique

Don Q Tours

We are a company that provides Quality Tourism Services according to wishes and needs of our clients

  • Local time:13:15

A journey through Guatemala's incomparable Mayan World

A journey that starts in Guatemala City, riding our Pullman buses or microbuses, taking an airline flight, towards the Island of Flores, Peten, Guatemala, and takes the visitor thru a hiking and camping expedition into the jungle of northern Guatemala countryside. All the camping equipment is included, also meals, water and others. Includes expert guides with enough experience to make it a memorable visit. During our tour we'll visit Tikal.

DAY 1

Visit Rio Dulce-Castle-Flores, Peten

The tour departs from Guatemala City and arrives to the city of Flores, Peten. We will make a Lunch stop (not included in this tour) at Rio Dulce, visit the Spanish conquistadores built Castillo de San Felipe. After the short stop at the castle for souvenir shopping and picture taking, then continue towards the island of Flores, Peten, formerly called Tayasal is located in Lake Peten Itzá, was from century IXC an Itzá city. In the fifteenth century Pedro de Alvarado on his journey to Honduras came to the island and left King Canek a horse, which was treated almost as a God. After several unsuccessful attempts to convert the Indians to Christianity, the Spaniards destroyed Tayasal in the 16th century and remained abandoned until the 18th century. It is currently called Flores Island in honor of Cirilo Flores, one of the first "independentistas" of Guatemala. Although small, it has varied restaurants, hotels, craft shops, Internet cafes, etc. The city of Flores is geared towards tourists who visit the ruins of Tikal. This splendid Maya site is located 65km (40 miles) away from Flores. The transfer in vehicle takes from 45 - 60 minutes. We will stay at a hotel in Flores, Peten. Read more

Flores, Peten and Others
More Pictures
DAY 2

Carmelita Encounter in La Tinta

We will continue tour thru the jungles of Peten towards El Tintal, in Carmelita. The Tintal is an archaeological site of the Mayan civilization in Guatemala. It dates from the Preclassic Period and is located in the Mirador Basin in the north of the department of Petén, approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 mi) north of the modern Carmelite village. A high Maya road (a sacbé) linked the site with the nearby site of El Mirador (20 kilometers (12.4 mi) to the north) and El Tintal is also located near the site of Nakbé (which is 20 kilometers Mi) to the northeast) .1 The site has structures of considerable size. We will Camp (tent) that night in El Tintal Camp Ground. The site of Tintal is located to the southeast of El Mirador. These two sites are linked through a causeway measuring 20 km long. Both sites have monumental architecture dating from the Late Preclassic period. The 2004 season completed the preliminary mapping of the site and the recording of looter’s trenches as well as the rescue excavations due to the looting at this site. What is surprising about the settlement pattern is that the civic center is completely surrounded by an artificial moat, like that built in the Preclassic site of Becan, Campeche. The sheer size of the structures indicates that Tintal was one of the major sites in the Mirador Basin and the connection by causeways to other large sites in the basin gives us a pattern of the development of the Preclassic state, as well as evidence of occupation during the Early and Late Classic periods. All the necessary equipment and meals included in our journey thru the jungle. Read more

Carmelita-El Tintal Village
More Pictures
DAY 3

On our Way to the Metropoly

We will camp (tent) at El Mirador, una ciudad del preclásico tardío maya, situada en la cuenca del Mirador, en el municipio de San Andrés del departamento de El Petén, Guatemala que data del 600 a. C. y fue parcialmente abandonada ca. 150 D. C. Fue posteriormente reocupada en el periodo clásico tardío y finalmente abandonada en el siglo IX D. C. A two-day trip by walking in nine-hour days a day between the jungle. This reserve is located in the northernmost part of the Republic of Guatemala, 90 km from Flores Island, in the jurisdiction of the municipality of San Andrés, El Petén department. From Carmelita to El Mirador, nine major sites are visited, among them El Tintal, the second Mayan city in size and also bigger than Tikal. This ancient city was connected to El Mirador by means of a Maya road (sacbé) of 20 km of length. There is evidence that the El Mirador area was occupied from the Middle Preclassic -1000 BC. C.-, but it was not until 350 A. C. that there was a boom of complex constructions. For example, in the northern sector, part of the Cascabael Group was built, which had 28-meter high buildings, the highest of the Middle Preclassic, 4 also found evidence of political-religious buildings, ball courts, roadways And monuments in the Cascabel, Monos and Sacalero Groups. We will be camping at El Mirador archeological site. All the necessary equipment and meals included in our journey thru the jungle. Read more

Site El Mirador 1 nights
More Pictures
DAY 4

Discovering El Mirador

We will spend all day exploring and visiting el Mirador Park, interesting and sacred Mayan Places and Altars, Pyramids, interior rives and small lakes. El Mirador Is surrounded by enigmas that attract archaeologists and tourists from all over the world. Its foundation dates from the Late Preclassic -600 years before Christ-, and is guarded by one of the most important wooded areas of the region. Dr. Richard Hansen, director of the Cuenca El Mirador archaeological project, admits his admiration for the city, which he has studied for 36 years. "Everything is awesome. There is no other culture like that of the Maya, "said the American archaeologist. The city has three sectors that connect to a network of roadways, which allowed communication between populations, It has 35 sets of triadic pattern - acropolis type. In addition to El Tigre and La Danta, the site also includes the buildings known as Los Monos and La Acropolis, which connect with the suburbs of the groups Los Faisanes, La Muerta and Los Cruces. In the Late Preclassic, between 250 and 200 BC, the area reached its peak, and El Mirador became the most important political center in the area, which controlled Nakbé, Tintal, Wakna, Xulnal and Calakmul, explained Hansen. He added that there is clear evidence of occupation from a thousand years before Christ, but that collapsed 150 years before the new era, when Tikal began to flourish. "This is why El Mirador is the first political system in the Americas that has the largest volume sites in the hemisphere, and that is why it is known as the cradle of Mayan culture," he said. That night we will stay again at El Mirador camp ground (tent). All the necessary equipment and meals included in our journey thru the jungle. Read more

El Mirador, Peten 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 5

Returning to Civilization

We will start our return to el Tintal again, where we will camp (tent) and spend the night. In that camping ground you will have rest rooms and will be able to have a well deserved good night sleep. You will be able to observe and explore around The Tintal Stela 1 was carved from red sandstone, it was found buried within a 2.5-meter (8.2 ft) structure near the northwest corner of the El Pavo pyramid in the Mano de León complex. The stela stood in the square for centuries after being carved. Stela 1 was rewashed sometime before the Early Classic Period, with elements of the earlier design surviving on the butt of the monument. The preserved designs on the butt include hundreds of carved lines and symbols forming graffiti in a typical style of Preclassic imagery in the region. The stela was deliberately mutilated during the Late Classic, the surviving parts of Stela 1 depict two feet in profile above a band containing other elements. The stela measures 4.5 meters (15 ft) high, 2 meters (6.6 ft) wide and 0.4 meters (16 in) thick. [22] It is judged to predate Tikal Stela 29 on stylistic grounds, the latter bears to Maya Long Count date to date in AD 292. The Tintal Stela 1 was associated with a circular limestone altar that had been displaced by the looters. The sandstone used for Stela 1 probably came from the Altar of Sacrifices region on the Usumacinta River and implies unusual cultural contacts with this relatively distant region. All the necessary equipment and meals included in our journey thru the jungle. Read more

Camping at El Tintal 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 6

Rencounter Carmelita Village

From El Tintal Camping station we will walk to Carmelita, where we will board the bus that will take us to The Island of Flores, Peten. There will register in our selected hotel. We will have the rest of the evening free to relax and recover our energies.

Flores, Peten, Guate 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 7

Lake Peten Itza Ecoreserve

Day to relax and enjoy around the Island in the morning. In Flores, you will be able to shop around for handicrafts, and enjoy the morning. At noon, we will travel to El Remate, in Lake Izabal, where we will be able to visit the Natural Reserve of Cerro Cahuí, enjoy the beach at the lake and enjoy our visit. We will able to have lunch at the Beach (not included with this offer) and in our way back we will visit the Mayan site of Yaxhá, to observe the sun set, that is a big spectacle to watch. Yaxhá - also known as Yaxha, Yax-ha and Yax-há- is an archaeological site and an ancient ceremonial center of the Mayan civilization located in northeastern Petén, Guatemala. It is located about 30 km southeast of Tikal in the Yaxhá-Nakum-Naranjo National Park. The site has more than five hundred structures, including forty stelae, thirteen altars, nine pyramids, two ball courts and a sacbeob network, connecting the Central Acropolis, North (Maler) and East. In Plaza C, there is the only complex of Twin Pyramids, outside its ally Tikal, which commemorates a Katún, or period of twenty years. The 80 m-long Causeway and considered the official entrance of the City in ancient times, connects it to Lake Yaxhá. After sun set we will return to Flores for dinner and overnight in or selected hotel. Read more

Flores, Peten, Guate 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 8

Tikal National Mayan Park - Jungle Lodge

On our 8th day, we will visit the famous Tikal National Park, With our expert guides to take you thru the day at the park. In 1979 it was declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco, both for its natural and cultural values. Tikal is located approximately 64 km, northeast of Flores and Santa Elena, approximately 303 km, north of Guatemala City. The city is 19 km south of the ancient Mayan city of Uaxactún, 30 km northwest of Yaxhá, 7 11 km to 100 km, southeast of Calakmul, its great rival of the Classic Period and 85 km, Northwest of El Caracol, the ally of Calakmul, now in Belize.12 The city, which covers an area of ​​more than 16 km², has been completely mapped and includes about 3000 structures.13 The site's topography consists of a series of limestone hills rising above swamp lands. The main architecture of the site is grouped into higher areas, which are interconnected by roadways that cross the swamps.14 The ruins are in the middle of the rainforest, in the Peten basin, which formed the cradle of Mayan civilization in the lowlands of Mesoamerica. The city is located in the middle of fertile soils, with elevated lands and may have dominated the natural commercial route, which runs from east to west, across the Yucatán peninsula.15 In spite of being one of the majors Mayan cities of the Classic, Tikal had no other sources of water, other than rainwater, which was collected and stored in ten reservoirs. Archaeologists who worked at Tikal during the twentieth century restored one of the ancient water reservoirs for their own use.16 The absence of fountains, rivers, and lakes in the vicinity of Tikal underscores a prodigious fact: Construction of a large city, counting exclusively on deliveries of seasonal rainfall. Tikal thrived with intensive farming techniques, which were far more advanced than logging and burning methods originally theorized by archaeologists. However, dependence on seasonal rainfall was a vulnerability in the face of prolonged droughts and some scientists believe that this vulnerability has played a role in Mayan collapse. Since 1990, it has been part of the worldwide network of biosphere reserves within the Maya Biosphere Reserve. Among the mammals that inhabit the park are the gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), the jaguar (Panthera onca), the puma (Puma con color), the yaguarundí (Herpailurus yaguarondi), the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), the margay (Leopardus wiedii) , The common paca (Agouti paca), the Mexican tamandua (Tamandua mexicanus), the kinkajú (Potos flavus), the boreal raccoon (Procyon lotor), the eira (Eira barbara), the red hare (Mazama americana) and the northern tapir (Tapirus bairdii); Also can be found agouti (Dasyprocta), coatis (Nasua), spider monkeys (Ateles), howler monkeys (Alouatta), peccaries (Tayassuidae), armadillos (Dasypodidae), bats (Microchiroptera). There is a great diversity of birds. These include the harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja), ocellated turkey (Meleagris ocellata), Falco deiroleucus (Falco deiroleucus), mottled quail (Odontophorus guttatus), Moctezuma congo (Psarocolius montezuma), American anhinga (Anhinga anhinga) , Jacana spinosa, Jacane spinosa, Cochlearius, Carrao (Aramus guarauna), Mexican agave (Tigrisoma mexicanum), the hooded parrot (Pionopsitta haematotis), the senile parrot (Pionus senilis) Frentialba (Amazona albifrons), Amazon frondrroja (Amazona autumnalis), amazon burrona (Amazona farinosa) and Piquisucio parakeet (Aratinga nana), as well as various species of hummingbirds (Trochilidae), toucans (Ramphastidae), carpenters (Picidae), Momotos (Momotidae) and cracids.In 1979 it was declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco, both for its natural and cultural values. Since 1990, it has been part of the worldwide network of biosphere reserves within the Maya Biosphere Reserve. Among the mammals that inhabit the park are the gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), the jaguar (Panthera onca), the puma (Puma concolor), the yaguarundí (Herpailurus yaguarondi), the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), the margay (Leopardus wiedii) , The common paca (Agouti paca), the Mexican tamandua (Tamandua mexicanus), the kinkajú (Potos flavus), the boreal raccoon (Procyon lotor), the eira (Eira barbara), the red hare (Mazama americana) and the northern tapir (Tapirus bairdii); Also can be found agouti (Dasyprocta), coatis (Nasua), spider monkeys (Ateles), howler monkeys (Alouatta), peccaries (Tayassuidae), armadillos (Dasypodidae), bats (Microchiroptera) ... There is a great diversity of birds. These include the harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja), ocellated turkey (Meleagris ocellata), falco deiroleucus, speckled quail (Odontophorus guttatus), Moctezuma (Psarocolius montezuma), American anhinga (Anhinga anhinga) , Jacana spinosa, Jacane spinosa, Cochlearius cochlearius, Carrao (Aramus guarauna), Mexican agave (Tigrisoma mexicanum), the hooded parrot (Pionopsitta haematotis), the senile parrot (Pionus senilis) Frentialba (Amazona albifrons), Amazon frondrroja (Amazona autumnalis), amazon burrona (Amazona farinosa) and Piquisucio parakeet (Aratinga nana), as well as various species of hummingbirds (Trochilidae), toucans (Ramphastidae), carpenters (Picidae) Momotos (Momotidae) and cracids. We will spend that night in the Tikal Jungle Lodge after this active day of visit to the park of Tikal. Read more

Peten 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 9

Travel from Tikal to Rio Dulce, Izabal

We will depart from Tikal towards Rio Dulce, Izabal. Traveling for about 5 hours, arriving after a stop for lunch (not included in the tour), where we will make a boat ride to Livingston, also in Izabal, Enjoying this unique journey thru the Rio Dulce by boat, with short stops at the floating gardens, Agua Caliente thermal area in the river, Arriving in the afternoon to Livingston, Where we will enjoy the rest of the evening relaxing and walking around the small town, shopping or just enjoying with the local people of this area. The cuisine is very special and oriented to sea food. We will stay that that night in Livingston. Livingston is named after American jurist and politician Edward Livingston who wrote the Livingston Codes which - translated into Spanish by liberal leader José Francisco Barrundia - were used as the basis for the laws of the liberal government of the United Provinces of Central America in the early 19th century. This government did not came to fruition in Guatemala, however, because of the conservative and clerical revolution led by Rafael Carrera in 1838 that overthrew governor Mariano Galvez and gave way to a conservative and Catholic regime that lasted until 1871 in Guatemala. Boats run several times a day from Puerto Barrios, and twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from Punta Gorda, Belize. Boats also run every morning from Livingston to Punta Gorda. However, due to collusion between boat owners, the fares are much higher than passage from Puerto Barrios. There is another boat that transports tourists from Livingston in through Río Dulce; it runs every day. All access is via watercraft since there is no road link to the rest of Guatemala. Read more

Livinston Hotels 1 night
More Pictures
DAY 10

Journey Livinston - Quirigua - Copan

From Livingston after breakfast (not included in the tour) we will travel early by boat to Puerto Barrios, Izabal, where we will take our bus to travel to the archeological park of Quirigua. Quiriguá (Spanish pronunciation: [kiɾiˈɣwa]) is an ancient Maya archaeological site in the department of Izabal in south-eastern Guatemala. It is a medium-sized site covering approximately 3 square kilometres (1.2 sq mi) along the lower Motagua River, with the ceremonial center about 1 km (0.6 mi) from the north bank. During the Maya Classic Period (AD 200–900), Quiriguá was situated at the juncture of several important trade routes. The site was occupied by 200, construction on the acropolis had begun by about 550, and an explosion of grander construction started in the 8th century. All construction had halted by about 850, except for a brief period of reoccupation in the Early Postclassic (c. 900 – c. 1200). Quiriguá shares its architectural and sculptural styles with the nearby Classic Period city of Copán, with whose history it is closely entwined. Quiriguá's rapid expansion in the 8th century was tied to king K'ak' Tiliw Chan Yopaat's military victory over Copán in 738. When the greatest king of Copán, Uaxaclajuun Ub'aah K'awiil or "18-Rabbit", was defeated, he was captured and then sacrificed in the Great Plaza at Quirigua. Before this, Quiriguá had been a vassal state of Copán, but it maintained its independence afterwards. The ceremonial architecture at Quiriguá is quite modest, but the site's importance lies in its wealth of sculpture, including the tallest stone monumental sculpture ever erected in the New World. A combination of hieroglyphic texts from Tikal, Copán and Quiriguá, together with architectural styles and chemical tests of the bones of the founder of the Copán dynasty all suggest that Quiriguá and Copán were founded by elite colonists from the great city of Tikal as a part of its expansion into the southeastern border area of the Maya region. The recorded history of Quiriguá starts in 426, in the Early Classic (c. 200 – c. 600); according to hieroglyphic inscriptions at other sites, on 5 September of that year K'inich Yax K'uk' Mo' was enthroned as king of Copán. Just three days later he installed "Tok Casper", the first known king of Quiriguá, upon the throne. From this it is evident that right from the beginning of its recorded history Quiriguá was subservient to its southern neighbour, and was founded to bring the lucrative trade route of the Motagua River under the control of Copán and, indirectly, of Tikal. During the next few centuries, about which little is known, the ceremonial architecture at Quiriguá was limited to the hilltop Group A and a broad earthen platform on the valley floor. It is recorded that a stela, as yet undiscovered, was erected in 455 by Tutuum Yohl K'inich, the second king of Quiriguá. An early monument records the supervision of a ritual in 480 by the then overlord from Copán, demonstrating Quiriguá's continued status as a vassal of that city. A hieroglyphic text dating to 493 mentions two further kings of Quiriguá, but interruptions in the text make the reading and decipherment of their names particularly difficult. After our visit to Quirigua, we will continue to a visit to Copan, in Honduras, other very important Mayan archeological park. We will arrive in the late afternoon to our hotel, where we will rest and spend a delightful evening in the township of Copan. Read more

Copan City Hotel 1 nigh
More Pictures
DAY 11

Visit to the Mayan City of Copan, Hond

This day we will visit the Mayan ruins of Copan. is an archaeological site of the ancient Mayan civilization located in the department of Copán to the west of Honduras, a short distance from the border with Guatemala. From the fifth century to the ninth century it was the capital of an important kingdom of the Classic period. The city was located at the southeastern end of the Mesoamerican cultural region, bordering the Isthmus-Colombian cultural region, in an area inhabited by non-Maya peoples. Today, this fertile valley contains a center Urban area of ​​about 3000 inhabitants, a small airport and a winding road. The human occupation of the site extends for more than two millennia, from the Early Preclassic to the Postclassic. The city developed a distinctive sculptural style within the tradition of the lowland Maya, perhaps to highlight the Mayan origin of the rulers of the city. The city has a historical record that covers most of the classical period and has been reconstructed in detail by archaeologists and epigraphists. Copán, originally probably called Oxwitik by the Maya, was a powerful city-state, ruling a Vast kingdom in the south of the Maya region. The city suffered a major political disaster in 738 AD. C., when Uaxaclajuun Ub'aah K'awiil, one of the greatest kings in the history of the Copan dynasty, was captured and executed by his former vassal, the king of Quiriguá. This unexpected defeat Resulted in a 17-year recess during which Copan may have been under the control of Quirigua. A significant part of the eastern side of the acropolis was affected by erosion caused by the Copan River, although the river was diverted in the 1930s in order to protect the site from major damage.1 In 1980 Copán was declared a The Humanity by UNESCO. In the afternoon, we will travel back to Guatemala, to visit the colonial city of Antigua Guatemala. There, we will spend the night. ​ Read more

Copan - Antigua Guatemala.
More Pictures
DAY 12

Visit to the City of Antigua Guatemala

We will enjoy a beautiful unforgettable visi to the city of Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala, whose official and historical name is Very Noble and Very Loyal City of Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala and popularly named today as Antigua Guatemala, is the head of the homonymous municipality and the department of Sacatepéquez, Guatemala; Is located approximately 45 kilometers to the west of the capital of the Republic of Guatemala, and to an altitude of 1470 msnm. During the time of the colony it was known as "Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala", and was the capital of the Captaincy General of Guatemala between 1541 and 1776, the year in which the capital was transferred to the city of Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción After the earthquakes in Santa Marta ruined the city for the third time in the same century3 and civil authorities used that as an excuse to weaken the ecclesiastical authorities - following the recommendations of the Bourbon Reforms undertaken by the Spanish crown in the second half of the Eighteenth-century forcing the regular orders to move from their majestic convents to fragile temporary structures in the new city. From the transfer the city was renamed "ruined Guatemala", "Santiago de Guatemala antigua" and "old city". It was abandoned by all royal and municipal authorities, and in 1784 by the two last parishes: "Candelaria" and "Nuestra Señora de los Remedios", also without ecclesiastical authorities.6 A few years later, Archbishop Cayetano Francos and Monroy authorized the Operation of three interim parishes that took the name of their predecessors: "San Sebastián", "Candelaria" and "Los Remedios", where they kept the largest number of religious art works that remained in ancient Guatemala. We will stay overnight in Antigua. Read more

Antigua Guatemala Hotels
More Pictures
DAY 13

Guatemala City historic downtown Tour

This is the last day of our tour. We will return from Antigua Guatemala, and enjoy a city tour of the city of Guatemala, whose official name is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, is the capital and seat of the government of the Republic of Guatemala, as well as the seat of the Central American Parliament. The city is located in the south-central area of ​​the country and has a large amount of green areas. According to the latest census in the city, 2,149,107 people live there, but considering its metropolitan area according to the National Institute of Statistics, it reaches an estimated 4,703,865 inhabitants for 2015,3 4 Which makes it the most populous and extensive urban agglomeration in Central America. The New Guatemala of the Assumption is the fourth settlement of the capital of the Kingdom of Guatemala. The reason for its transfer to the Valley of the Ermita were the earthquakes of Santa Marta, that destroyed to a large extent the city of Santiago de Guatemala, the old capital of the Kingdom of Guatemala. The transfer order was given on December 1, 1775 and on January 2 of the following year there was a meeting for the first time in the city council of the new city. A plaque, which stands in front of the Santa Cruz Parish, just at the beginning of the Milla and Vidaurre road named after the writer and diplomat José Milla y Vidaurre, commemorates this fact. The name of the new city was decreed by the King of Spain on January 23, 1776. Its development has been affected in numerous occasions by natural disasters, earthquakes in their majority, that have devastated the city and its surroundings receding in her years of development. The last one that affected it was the earthquake of 1976 that seriously damaged the modern structure built and that was under construction, as well as historical relics such as the churches of Our Lady of La Merced, La Recolección, Nuestra Señora del Cerrito del Carmen - First church built in the valley around 1620-, and the Central Market building. We will visit the most relevant buildings and monuments in the city. At night, we will offer a night bohemian tour from 7pm to 11pm around the historic and zone 10, the main attractions in the city for after hours entertainment. This activity will close the Journey thru our Main Mayan Attractions. Read more

Guatemala City hotels
More Pictures

ACCOMMODATIONS

Day in trip
Location
Hotel
Day 1
Location Santa Elena, Paten, Guatemala
Day 6
Location Santa Elena, Paten, Guatemala
Day 7
Location Santa Elena, Paten, Guatemala
Day 8
Location Tikal, Peten, Guatemala
Hotel Jaguar Inn
Day 9
Location Livingston, Izabal, Guatemala
Day 10
Location Copan town, Honduras
Day 11
Location Antigua Guatemala
Day in trip
Location
Hotel
Day 1
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 6
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 7
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 8
Location Tikal, Peten, Guatemala
Hotel Tikal Inn
Day 9
Location Livingston, Izabal, Guatemala
Day 10
Location Copan City, Honduras
Day 11
Location Antigua, Guatemala
Day in trip
Location
Hotel
Day 1
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 6
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 7
Location Flores, Peten, Guatemala
Day 8
Location Tikal, Peten, Guatemala
Hotel Jungle lodge
Day 9
Location Livingston, Izabal, Guatemala
Hotel Villa Caribe
Day 10
Location Copan City, Honduras
Day 11
Location Antigua, Guatemala

TRIP PACKAGE

Package includes

  • Transfer from/to the airport
  • Transport during the tour
  • Accommodation
  • Local guides
  • Information services
  • Entrance fee

Package excludes

  • Airfare
  • Personal expenses
  • Visa, consular 76 fees or any other formalities.
  • Tips
  • Beverages
  • Additional journeys and transfers
  • Meals

More information

  • All camping equipment will be issued by our partners in Peten. Also meals and water will be supply by our team when traveling thru the jungle.

REVIEWS

2 Reviews

Dora Clemencia Lira Trujillo , Honduras

Todo estuvo acorde a lo pactado con anterioridad, ya que el hotel fue de nuestro total agrado, así como los distintos transportes que seleccionaron para nuestro servicio, la atención recibida por su personal fue muy completa y servicial en todo el recorrido!

Rose A. Molina , Guatemala

Por este medio les hago llegar mi agradecimiento por todo su apoyo, todo estuvo perfecto desde la organización hasta el momento de llevarlo a cabo, los lugares que asignaron para que yo pudiera visitar eran muy bonitos, quede impresionada con los paisajes en el tren, los hoteles en los que me hospede todos de muy buena calidad, cómodos y con muy buen servicio, el transporte muy seguro y puntual, quede con ganas de regresar, más porque no me fue posible visitar Machu Picchu por manifestaciones en el lugar, pero todo fue de la mejor manera, esperando poder viajar nuevamente con ustedes. Read more

BEST MONTHS

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12

SIMILAR TRIPS

WHY USE US

Your Dream Comes True

Easily find your favorite trip style and destination. Optimal matching with local travel professionals that will make your dream come true.

Best Quality

All our trips are quality assured by our experienced international travel teams. We’ve selected only the best destination management experts to ensure that your trip experience will be plain sailing all the way.

Fast and Easy

Find your favorite trip, pick your destination and plan your personalized vacation with a local expert in just 3 easy steps. No searching hundreds of websites! One place, all your dream vacations!

No Middleman

With Ollami, there’s no third party between you and the local experts. YOU pick your travel expert. YOU have full control of your costs and WE give you peace of mind that there are no hidden fees or charges.

Personal Reviews

All our reviews are written by REAL travelers who have experienced our service first hand. With Ollami you can expect great trips, real reviews and absolutely no surprises.

Satisfaction Guaranteed

Your experience is our priority. We offer secure payments, 24/7 professional customer service worldwide via phone, email, chat or Skype.